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>>> closed captioning of twbl twbl is made possible by the firemen's foundation. >>> california public schools rank lowest in the nation. >> we are a bare bones organization. we are just able to keep the lights on, the doors open and the teachers in the classrooms. >> how do tax dollars flow to public education? >> when the state goes through a budget crisis, schools are going to be in the cross hairs. >> with two competing tax measures on the november ballot, what's at stake for the state and its budget strapped schools? coming up next. >>> hello. i'm al letson, in for belva davis. welcome to a special edition of "this week in northern california." with the november election just around the corner, the campaigns are heating up for propositions 30 and 38. tonight, we want to cut through the noise and try to make sense of what really is at stake for schools if one or both or neither get the green light. we'll hear from both sides in just a few minutes. plus, get some in depth analysis from two veteran education reporters. but first, we wanted to see just how bad the budget situat
edition of "this week in northern california." with the november election just around the corner, the campaigns are heating up for propositions 30 and 38. tonight, we want to cut through the noise and try to make sense of what really is at stake for schools if one or both or neither get the green light. we'll hear from both sides in just a few minutes. plus, get some in depth analysis from two veteran education reporters. but first, we wanted to see just how bad the budget situation is in our schools. and how it got that way in the first place. pbs news hour correspondent spencer michaels takes a look. >> in schools around the state, there's a feeling that the ax is about to fall. and if and when it does, san francisco school superintendent will have to act. >> we have our doomsday plan. part of that is lopping days off of the school year. and it can be up to ten days next year. that's two weeks off of the school year. >> richard caranza says his district, though well supported by voter-passed bond measures and parcel taxes, has suffered as the state's economy tanked and, along w
>>> closed captioning of "this week in northern california" is made possible by the firemen's fund foundation. >> belva: the presidential candidates get back to the campaign trail after their first debate, with governor romney picking up some momentum. president obama returned to the golden state this weekend. there's high interest in several congressional races in the state. will california tip the scales for the control of the u.s. house? governor brown vetoes few of the more than 1,800 bills on his desk, as he presses for support of proposition 30 on the november ballot. and gas jumped as much as 20 cents overnight, with the spike expected to continue. plus, anti-domestic violence leader estra sola on making all violence an issue of global concern, coming up next. >>> good evening, i'm belva davis and welcome to "this week in northern california." on our news panel tonight, dan walters, political column nis for "the sacramento bee." in studio, we have tom vacar, computer editor for ktvu news and josh richman, regional political reporter for the bay asia news group. and joe garof
care. >> for the first time in more than three decades, california voters will decide whether or not to abolish the death penalty, and if the state's three strikes law should be reform reformed. the controversy continues over san francisco sheriff ross mirkarimi's future even after he's reinstated by the board of supervisors. >>> plus writer lynn povich and her husband, steve shepard on journalism's transition to the digital age, coming up next. >>> good evening. i'm belva davis and welcome to this week in northern california. joining me on our news panel tonight are barbara taylor, kcbs city hall reporter and scott shafer, host of the california report on kqed public radio. and carla marinucci, san francisco chronicle senior political writer. carla, there is so much going on in politics today. let's start with the vice presidential debate. people said they wanted action. what did they get? >> that's right. you could almost hear the cheers coming out of san francisco, the bars and so forth as it was going on this week. a slugfest, a political slugfest. this is what the democra
, and welcome to this week in northern california. joining us is lisa krueger, science reporter. and regional political reporter. and cory cook, political scientist. cory, let's start with you. you teach this stuff, you study this stuff. tell us, what are we seeing that is so new this year? >> i think the sheer amount of money we're talking about is new. you had in september alone both mitt romney and president obama raised the most money individually than the two candidates spent in 2004 combined. on the presidential level, we're talking about 2 or 3 billion spent for a local election, magnitudes increase over previous years. >> give us the roots. >> a lot comes from outside groups. our new campaign finance system encourages groups to spend money despite the campaigns. american crossroads is an organization started by car carl rove which allows them to runny tv commercials they want, but they also have a group gps, a non-profit dedicated to social welfare, which means they don't even have to disclose where the money comes from. half a billion right now is just from organizations. >> part of
in california is the sound of a hoover vacuum sucking money out of california. at a certain point it reaches diminished returns, because people can all play -- can only see so many as so many times, but will we get to a place where the american public will be outraged by the amount of money we are spending, and might we see a day where we say, we are changing the rules. we can only campaign for a three-month time. these are too much. >> i hate to be cynical, but i am skeptical. they were writing the laws. good politicians act on a self interest and what the public demands. one fast point, you mentioned california, and that is where campaign finance matters. most people have a strong view about president obama or mitt romney. where this really has an impact is local but also on state emissions. california has all kinds of stuff on the balanced, because if you have got more money than your opponent, you could win. tavis: joe biden has apparently written a tell-all, and i am told it is not a flattering picture he paints of the vice president. i do not know if that would have any impact. the que
for the new york times. his thoughts on a controversial anti-union proposition in california and we would discuss the passing of a liberal lion over the weekend, george mcgovern. a conversation with adam nagourney of the new york times coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: adam nagourney is the l.a. bureau chief for the new york times following years as the paper's chief national political correspondent. good to have you back on this program. we finally arrive at a day i thought would never come. the debates are finally over. it just two weeks from election day. it has been a perennial campaign. let me start with a question that has been on my mind a lot. wha
. when earl warren was the attorney general and then the governor of california, he was a conservative republican. in fact, he was one of those about in tearing japanese americans during the war. -- about treating the japanese americans one way during the war. there are a number of republicans in the book. in fact, in the early it 20th century -- the early 20th century, there were a few, the governor of california, and even fewer roosevelt, who has an ambiguous record. -- even theodore roosevelt, who has an empire -- -- an ambiguous record. there are people who kept it alive, like earl warren, who had a change of heart. tavis: let me ask you anyway, because i want to be fair to both sides. paul ryan, and there are those things that people say about him. lambasting his plan. but he, more than romney, more than obama, more than biden talks about the issue of poverty. he gave an entire speech about poverty in america. he has in his own way of dealing with the issue -- he has his own way of dealing with the issue. i wonder whether or not there is something to appeal specifically to him abo
: pump prices have hit a new record in california, climbing to $4.67 a gallon today, according to triple "a", but some cities are experiencing even higher prices. for drivers, the good news is prices are expected to fall, but california remains vulnerable to quick price hikes. refinery and pipeline problems have put the squeeze on supplies and california drivers. >> well its pretty crazy. >> i think it sucks. big time i mean its terrible" >> the went up pretty high from last week." >> they just jump them up real quick and then it takes forever to get them back down again it is pretty ridiculous. >> tom: today's average price in the state, $4.67 a gallon for regular unleaded. that's $0.50 higher than a week ago. $0.86 higher than the national average. wholesale gas prices fell today after california governor jerry brown yesterday eased the state's gas-blend requirements. the change allows refiners to start processing a less- expensive winter fuel blend today, about three weeks ahead of schedule. california's strict air quality standards require a specific gasoline blend that's not necessa
california, you can check in, but you can never -- >> trust the staff with your valuables. >> that is true anywhere. >> but especially california, and j.k., north mexico. -- a.k.a., north mexico. >> is more about his turn, professorial facade. >> with me always is my and burk translator. after the recent town hall debate and the town halt -- the town hall debate -- >> i've got my sweater back. >> when you do make a joke, it has the risk of offending a lot of people. on the iran, most canadians do not care if they have offended you, and that is -- on the other hand, most comedians and do not care if they have offended you. that is where, it gives them strength. >> that is it for our newshour. thanks so much for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international
former mcdonald's executives launched lyfe kitchen last year in palo alto, california. now, they plan to take the restaurant and "it's good for you" menu nationwide. diane eastabrook has more. >> reporter: lyfe kitchen opened in the heart of silicon valley a year ago. lyfe, an acronym for "love your food everyday," serves up burgers, fish tacos, breakfast sandwiches, salads, even organic beer. yet nothing on the menu is over 600 calories it's the brainchild of two former mcdonald's executives and an investment banker. they've rolled out frozen lyfe meals, and next week break ground on a second store near los angeles. in his chicago office today, co- founder michael donahue told me there will be a lot more to lyfe. >> we're looking at new york, we're looking in chicago, and we're looking at a few other major markets. if i put the map on the wall, you could pick them. >> reporter: obviously, in california, you have people who are more health conscious, so this kind of idea would sell very well there. but can it sell in the midwest? can it sell in the east coast? can it sell in the south
, the hardest talk. this land is your land, this land is my land, from california to the new york island. >> monday night, third and final presidential debate was on foreign policy. and the most sensitive and dangerous foreign policy issue, which is the bomb. >> as long as i'm president of the united states iran will not get a nuclear weapon. >> a nuclear iran number clear capable iran is unacceptable to americ israel. and if israel is attacked, we have their back. >> if israel is attacked, america will stand with israel. >>> president obama and governor romney were largely in agreement on a range of foreign policy concerns. particularly those centering on the middle east. the ouster of former president mubarak of egypt, the 2014 exit date for afghanistan, the killing of terrorists with nutes romney and obama echoed each other. >> question. is bipartisanship now back in style at least when it comes to foreign policy in a presidential debate? pat buchanan? >> no it isn't but they are moving toward consensus where the american people are at. they are both pro israel, going to stand beside
, los angeles fails, california fails, but latinos feel this as well. tavis: how important is it to have voices in mainstream media that get a chance to express this view? >> one would be nice. i am struggling. when you look at the sunday morning shows, they are fairly monolithic, and once in awhile you will have someone, but i think that is the issue. we have not had because the moment in the hispanic community. we are still seeing it out of the mainstream to actually speak english. people are amazed that i speak english. it is quite a challenge to have a diverse latino zins in way. if no one tunes in to watch those shows, that will eventually change it. >> i think we will be hearing your voice. up next, the grammy nominated jazz artist robert glasper. stay with us. robert glasper is a grammy nominated judge pianist. -- jazz pianist. ♪ tavis: i have always loved that your group is called the robert glasper experiment. >> it was supposed to be called the experiment, and i like it. tavis: i can think of a number of things, but the difference between experience and an experiment. >> it i
this story that has knotted fully emerged. >> which we learned at the end of the week about california. their numbers were not included. >> how can you put the numbers of the nation without the numbers for california which were not in it? it vitiates the whole reported. >> they then come back and revise numbers. they revise numbers every month. it is as much an art as it is a science. sometimes businesses don't get their numbers in. it is not precise. >> can it be cooked? >> all of it is that the economy is slowly recovering. >> john we did a segment awhile ago on libor, the famous interest rates. and we found out all the banks in england were cooking the biggest number in the world. of course they can. there is another factor behind jack welch. the drop in unemployment was the greatest drop in 30 years, since the reagan recovery, and there is no reagan recovery going on out there. >> well, the libor people who were cooking the books were all people pulling down six figure salaries. they are not the government bureaucrats. >> they get six figure salaries, too. >> these are career peopl
claims not reported by the state of california last week. the labor department calls the distortions temporary and blames technical factors in its collection process. investors were also on the lookout for news out of europe. european leaders kicked off a two-day summit in brussels to work more on resolving the european union's debt crisis. joining us now with what to expect from that meeting, andres garcia-amaya, global market strategist at j.p. morgan asset management. andres, there's been 22 summits over the past 2 years since the debt crisis started. do you think that the europeans have lost their sense of urgency to solve this? >> i think to a certain extent f you look at, by the way, this is the fourth summit this year alone. but these summits to a certain extent, you can't expect any-- to come out of it. it is important to get the leaders in one room and try to address the big issues. having said that we think the fiscal cries liss probably drag on for a while. when you have 27 politician all trying to agree on one thing it's hard enough in this country with two, imagine 27. s
stayed in new york and not come to california? >> not at all. we all have these choices to make in life than we do not know where we are going to wind up. i was saying to her, i got my ph.d. at the university of iowa. i wanted to be a professor and i interviewed a couple of places, including minneapolis. usc gave me a job and i came here. maybe i would be writing about swedish immigrants, but i came here and there was the debate over illegal immigration from the south. i wrote a book to try to address that. i've written several books set in southern california. i would have been a totally different artist if i had stayed in new york or gone to minneapolis or stayed in iowa city. it is where life takes you. we are all curious. i am extremely curious about where i live and what goes on here. here were these channel islands. i had never been to the channel islands. there they are, sitting right off the shore. i see them every day. what goes on out there? now i know. tavis: it is not like you spent a whole lot of time trying to research for the book. >> when we last talked, i was lucky enou
involves california's proposition 8. that proposition bannedded same sex marriage in california. >> brown: wading into an area where states are voting all the time on. >> absolutely. railroad referendums on a number of state ballots involving same sex marriage. >> brown: just a couple of other cases we might see. civil rights. voting rights act of 1965. >> yes. there are challenges to what is considered the crown jewel of the civil rights movement. section 5 of the 1965 voting rights act requires jurisdictions that have a history of past discrimination in voting to get pre-approval from the justice department or a federal court in washington whenever they make changes in their voting practices. that secon... that section is bg challenged in two cases although the court hasn't said it would review them. also we may see section 5 being challenged in cases involving voter i.d. laws. as you know the justice department has filed a number of suits in states that have enactd voter identification laws. >> brown: all right. now, when we last talkd, things ended with tension, with questions about t
of the united states and the west were originally part of mexico. california, nevada, parts of utah, texas, new mexico, arizona, colorado. that was all the northern territory of mexico, and there were mexican citizens living on that land before it became part of the united states. as they say in south texas or in northern new mexico, southern colorado, we didn't cross the border, the border crossed us. >> mexicans have a big presence here and they have had a big presence here. and it just does to show you how this country is a country of immigrants. so it's very difficult when you hear people say american values and american values are being threatened by the influx of immigrants from other countries. what american values? american values are values of immigrants that made this country. >> i'll throw out it's easy to argue for an open border, right, like the european community. it is never going to happen here. i don't think so. >> why? >> because the economic differences are so big. when an immigrant here in the united states can make in half an hour what they make a day in mexico, about $5 a
. >> woodruff: all of this played out as the president himself was in southern california. he declared the home of the late farm workers' union leader caesar chavez a national landmark. he also held fund-raisers in los angeles and san francisco. his campaign and the democratic national committee raised $181 million in september, the most for any month this year. but money aside, it appears romney's performance in last week's highly watched debate has improved his standing in the race. a new gallup tracking poll found the candidates in a dead heat, each receiving 47% among registered voters. the president had held a five-point advantage before the debate. and the pew research center showed romney coming from eight points down to four points ahead among likely voters. there were also signs that he's regained ground in several battle ground states. all of which raises the stakes for this thursday'sen counter between vice president joe biden and vice president shall candidate paul ryan. a debate that will cover both domestic and foreign policy. for more on all this for more on all of this and the d
-- he joined the from newport beach, california. as voters watch this debate and make their decision about the american election, what will be the biggest decision under president obama or a president romney? >> they will hear that there will be lots of differences, but the reality is a difference. at this stage, each candidate is trying to -- themselves. they do this by raising doubt about the other. look for romney to claim that obama will raise taxes across the board. look for obama to claim that romney will destroy the social safety net. the reality is that whoever wins in november will have a very small set of policies they can pursue if they want to put this economy back on track. there will have to do a bit of both. this " reform on the tax side and the expenditure side. >> on a camping trip with her for mitt romney that he will be much more aggressive about cutting the federal deficit. will he do that? >> no. he is going to have to recognize that if he goes too far, he will undermine this recovery that america is going through right now. at the end of the day, there's only a
into a wet area. the marshall said, you cannot go into that area. that is the habitat of the california salamander. damaging his habitat cost $50,000 and you get a year in jail. i said, man, if black people had these kind of protections -- [laughter] i went on the department of the interior to look at the endangered species list. virtually everyone, from societal neglect to large species in captivity, too encroachment in the national habitat, ultimately it became a social experiment. you will very rarely see -- if you took a gray wolf, which has habitat challenges, and changed his name to trayvon martin, he would get less sympathy. it seemed like an interesting place. tavis: what do you say to black men or others to feel insulted by the very comparison to the gray wolf, to the salamander? >> i think if people had the sympathy for us that they had four other species that were in danger, there would be in a better position. if you cannot argue that we are -- the dinosaur is not here because of the education age. it poses those kind of challenges for black men. i will never forget that i a
ought to understand about america? >> well, he lives here. >> rose: he did, southern california. >> he lived in southern california. and he basically decided he liked america, he liked the economic system. he liked a lot of the people he met. but he thought that we were culturally too crass, that women were object find, tha that-- objectified. that-- and you know, that he-- he supported the muslim culture of being less-- he thought we were too overtly sexual a society and all of that. and there is something to his argument there. but what he should know or should make sure his fellow egyptians know about america is that this rioting which he-- he has spoken out against, against this movie trailer, is premised on the fact that there's no division between church and state. we had to know about this movie being made, we had to know-- which was never made by the way, it had to be done by somebody's sanctions, and if it wasn't we would prove it by putting everybody associated with it in jail, open and shut, over and out. what he should make sure the egyptians should know about us is the rea
talk about multiple studies of these machines, every single one found problems and in california, when the secretaries state response sportsdesk study done by independent computer security experts, of all the machines, most of the machines that have been used in california, the red team which is the good guys, who try to break in, they broke into all of them, all of them. the software team found robs with all of them. so it is not just debold but the other companies too, but the probably is, with debold who have known about these things for a long time, even with all that is known about debold they are still being voted on. >> rose: might there be some better solution around the corner? >> beyond paper? i mean you are really hanging your argument on paper. >> right. as a scientist, i cannot say that there is not a better solution. i mean obviously there could be a better solution. but somebody to keep in mind is, whatever solution we have, it has to be possible to be able to verify the results. we have to convince the losers, to believe they lost, and the loser's supporters will ques
, based in california, surveyed more than 1,000 public and private non- profit, four-year colleges. it also cited studies showing that more than one-third of recent graduates have jobs that do not require a college degree at all. indeed, in tuesday's presidential debate, republican mitt romney pointed to her research that the disparity between jobs and degrees is even worse. >> we have to make sure that we make it easier for kids to afford college and also make sure that when they get out of college, there's a job. with half of college kids graduating this year without a college-- or excuse me, without a job and without a college- level job, that's just unacceptable. and likewise, you got more and more debt on your back. so more debt and less jobs. >> woodruff: in fact, student loan debt now outpaces credit card debt in the united states and by some measures, exceeds $1 trillion. and in a new "time" magazine poll-- conducted with the carnegie corporation-- 80% of those surveyed said many colleges are simply not worth the cost. 89% said higher education is in crisis. president obama
, and ohio as well as burbank california for an appearance on the tonight show. >> woodruff: for more on last night >> woodruff: for more on last night's debate, we turn again to two experts on foreign policy- richard haas, president of the council on foreign relations. he's in chicago. and in boston, former u.s. diplomat nicholas burns, now with the kennedy school of government at harvard university. welcome to you both. let me just ask you to start broadly speaking. what do we take away from last night's debate in terms of how well these two candidates understand american foreign policy and would be a good steward of it? let me start with you. nick burns. >> well, judy, this may sound startling to say in our present red-blue divided partisan environment but i think we have two impressive people running for president. they're both knowledgeable. they're both very smart about the issues. both of them have been successful in nearly everything they've tried in their professional lives. president obama was clearly the more knowledgeable and nuanced and even some's ticketed in the way he describe
a division in california. when we have a big project to work on with a big deadline the engineers in china work through the night, sleep under their desk, i don't have to ask them to do that. the guys in california, they go home at 5:00 to be home with their families. that's the difference between my country and america. >> rose: so what -- >> and i think as an american i see that there's a country that's very hungry and with a lot of technical talent, great desire to succeed, population that invests in education, science, technology, math. so i think that should be a wakeup call in america for us to remember the virtues that got us here but let's not over do it i always say. china has an innovation powerhouse that leaves a lot to be desired. we're barely at the end of cheap china that is being a sweatshop to the world. >> rose: barely at the end? >> barely at the end. partly to deal with demography and rising wages. and good reasons. chinese families don't want environmental sludge dumped on their children, either. so they're demanding and getting environmental regulations. >> rose: you d
for everything. so i did this university for three years. and then i had a stint at san diego, california, which is a place that i really adore. but i guess i was looking more for a new york energy and it didn't have it. so i then went to london, 1976, to study kpun cases. i went to california to do international relations then went to london-- it was really just any excuse to be able to be kept by my parents in a way. in london i fell into photography. >> rose: how did you fall into it. >> it's a really funny story. i believe so much that things come to you. and basically i went to a friend's house for lunch and there was a foted owe of himself on his mantle piece. and i said what a great photograph. and he told me this girl studying photography here took it. i said i have always heard of this girl i would love to meet her. i went to meet her at her school. when a rifed if he school she said to me what are you doing. i said well i have applied to the university. and they have me don't need me for next year but i need a school if i want to stay because i need a student visa. she said why don't y
is founder and head of the norman lear center at the university of southern california's annenberg school for communication and journalism. the center focuses on the bustling intersection of show business and politics. he's been a producer and screenwriter as well as a speechwriter for then vice president walter mondale and a colleague of the late u.s. commissioner of education ernest boyer. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> kathleen, the last time you were here you said all we've got left in the search for truth and knowledge is the debate. all right, are you satisfied now? >> no, we did not get an answer to the question that i wanted answered, which is "what are the sacrifices you're going to ask of us? where are you going to get the money that we need in a way that won't tank the economy, that will increase the likelihood of economic growth?" and so, the problem now facing the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to s
for the holiday selling season, samsung can sell its galaxy tablet again in the u.s. a california federal court lifted the sales ban late yesterday. in june, a judge temporarily stopped galaxy sales as samsung and apple fought a patent case in court. in august a jury ruled the south korean company's tablet computer did not infringe on apple's patents. the galaxy 10.1 is an older model, but analysts say it still could deliver big sales for samsung over the holidays. now, what do apple, coca-cola, and ibm have in common? each earned the top three spots on interbrand's annual best global brands list. coca-cola is holding steady at number one for the 12th year in a row. but apple, the maker of the popular iphones and ipads, is close on its heels, jumping to number two thanks to stellar global sales. while tech companies dominate half of the top ten positions on the list, blackberry finds itself at the bottom, plummeting to 93 as the company struggles to reinvent itself. >> down the table, and by no means a prediction of future movement. it's about products, people, culture, and about making sure th
by the firemen's foundation. >>> california public schools rank lowest in the nation. >> we are a bare bones organization. we are just able to keep the lights on, the doors open and the teachers in the classrooms. >> how do tax dollars flow to
assessments. and today two republican congressmen, oversight committee chairman darrell issa of california and jays leveled new allegations. in a letter to secretary of state clinton, they charged washington rejected multiple requests for security improvements at been gas emission. they base their assertions on unidentified sources described as multiple u.s. federal government officials. the state department spokeswoman said the secretary would respond in writing this very day. >> her response is going to be relatively succinct today, as i said, expressing her complete commitment to work with the congress to get fully to the bottom of this. but i don't anticipate she'll be able to answer the specific questions today >> warner: the two congressmen say their committee will hold a hearing next wednesday on the libya attack. meanwhile the f.b.i. has sent a team to libya to determine just what happened. and secretary clinton named a review board to assess security arrangements at that u.s. consulate and others. and while the investigations proceed, the "new york times" reported today that the p
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)